Confidence and experienceAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  1. I have a continual feeling that I haven't quite done enough.

  2. I feel I don't know whether I'm doing the right thing or not.

  3. Experience has taught me that being cautious sometimes isn't necessarily a bad thing.

Tolerance of risk and uncertaintyAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 4. When it comes to medicine I'm quite cautious.

  • 5. As a GP you think that you can deal with most things most of the time.

  • 6. I think my risk assessment is reasonably good, and I'm reasonably safe.

  • 7. All GPs take risks; it's risk assessment in general practice all the time.

  • 8. GPs are good at living with uncertainty and risk.

  • 9. I don't worry about my decisions after I've made them.

  • 10. I sometimes go back and check on the patient's outcome after a shift has finished.

Complaints by patients or relativesAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 11. I don't worry about a complaint being made about me.

  • 12. I have had complaints made against me.

  • 13. Fear of litigation influences my practice.

Attitudes to hospital admissionAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 14. A benefit of admission is that it reduces the risk of being sued.

  • 15. It's easier to send somebody in and get the hospital to check them out than to leave them at home.

  • 16. Admitting someone to hospital enables me to get a second opinion.

  • 17. Admitting someone to hospital means I can speed up urgent tests.

  • 18. Admitting someone to hospital puts them in danger of being ‘over-tested’.

Patient-related factorsAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 19. The most important factor in my decision to admit is the patient's clinical status.

  • 20. I am more likely to admit a person if they want to be admitted.

  • 21. If a family wants me to admit their relative I would be more inclined to admit them.

  • 22. I see myself as a negotiator, ‘selling’ my decision (whatever that is) to family and carers.

  • 23. If members of the family say there's nobody to look after someone, I see that as a problem for the family rather than the doctor.

  • 24. I am more likely to admit someone if they live alone.

  • 25. I am more likely to admit someone if they are poorly housed.

MotivationAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 26. I like the nature of the clinical work in OOH care.

  • 27. I work in OOH because I like the financial rewards.

  • 28. I enjoy working with my OOH organisation.

  • 29. I dislike the work in OOH because it is different from routine GP work.

  • 30. I do not enjoy working with the larger network of GPs, nurses, and other staff OOH.

  • 31. I work in OOH because I feel responsible for the quality of care that our patients receive OOH.

Organisational factorsAgree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 32. I think intermediate care is probably much better for the patient if they can have it.

  • 33. I have experienced difficulty arranging intermediate care for someone.

  • 34. Hospital nurses are less likely than hospital doctors to confront you about your decision to admit.

  • 35. I feel guilty when I admit a patient.

  • 36. We are increasingly under pressure not to admit people.

Job satisfaction (in your work as a doctor)Agree stronglyAgree a littleNeither agree nor disagreeDisagree a littleDisagree strongly
  • 37. I feel that some parts of my work do not make sense.

  • 38. My work still interests me as much as it ever did.

  • 39. Assuming that pay and conditions were similar, I would just as soon do non-medical work.

  • 40. I find enjoyment in my work.

  • 41. My work involves a great deal of wasted effort on my part.